Parental Arguments Continue

‘This, the King decided, was the moment for reconciliation. A tactful letter from the Queen to her daughter-in-law emphasized that she should now prepare to welcome her husband home, and that, to make the reconciliation complete, both parties should abstain from reproaches, or confiding in others on the subject.

This idyllic state of affairs was not achieved. By now, neither party wanted a reconciliation, and Caroline, knowing that there was no hope of happiness for her in the Prince’s company, was well aware of the strength of her position while she remained the injured party, separated from a man who would never, in any circumstances, remain faithful to her. Through the friends that she begun to make, she saw that she could play a little game of her own.

All this time, the baby in the Carlton House was forgotten; or rather she became a sort of theatrical property baby, dandled by each parent in turn for extra dramatic effect.

“I cannot close this letter,” the Prince told his father, “without adverting to the situation of my poor little girl. As a father I must feel the greatest anxiety to secure to her the advantages suitable to her birth,& which unfortunately her mother has neever known. Straitened as my income is…”

“I adjure you”, Caroline addressed her husband … “to remember … the paternal sentiments you owe to your child, who will suffer all her life from our disunion.”

On the thirteenth of June, when Charles James Fox won the Westminster election, the Prince complained bitterly of his wife “carrying the poor little girl to the window when Fox’s mob was passing, in order to make her also an instrument against her much injured father”.’

[an extract from ‘Prinny’s Daughter: A Biography of Princess Charlotte of Wales’ by Thea Home]

George Charlotte and Caroline

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