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Moving Into Claremont

At this point Leopold was attacked once again by the violent pain in his face which had afflicted him before. Once again, he was obliged to part with a tooth, but a few days later he and Charlotte took the air together in an open barouche, along the Harrow Road. By this time they were determined to move out of the uncomfortable and depressing Camelford House at the earliest opportunity. The purchase of Claremont had by now gone through Parliament and had received the Royal Assent. The move was arranged for August 23: the furniture and household goods to go in military waggons, while stage coaches were hired to take the servants and the luggage, followed by Sir Robert Gardiner and the household in carriages. Finally the Prince and Princess took leave, without regret, of Camelford House, and set out in their travelling carriage, arriving at Claremont in time for dinner. They were welcomed by the bells ringing from Esher Church, and Charlotte, climbing the wide steps up to the front door, exclaimed as she looked back over the peaceful countryside, ‘Thank Heaven I am here at last!’

(…)

For Charlotte, who, as she grew up, had been bundled into one or other of the less attractive royal houses, Claremont must have seemed a veritable paradise. After Warwick House and Lower Lodge, Windsor (‘this infernal dwelling’), she must have revelled in the spaciousness and beauty of the grounds, and the dignity of the house with its well-proportioned rooms, and great gallery at the back, which had been built to fit a magnificent carpet carpet presented to Lord Clive [one of the previous owners] when he left India.

‘To Claremont’s terraced heights and Esher’s groves,
Where in the sweetest solitude embraced
By the soft winding of the silent Mole,
From courts and cities Charlotte finds repose …’

The Princess adapted some lines by the poet Thomson to for an inscription upon a snuff-box for her husband, epitomizing her happiness in Claremont and Leopold. She had indeed, after the twenty-one turbulent years of her life, ‘found repose’. She was happy; and the marriage which she had envisaged so coolly as an escape from something worse had turned out to be a source of deep contentment, a fulfilment of all that she could ever have hoped.

[an extract from ‘Prinny’s Daughter: A Biography of Princess Charlotte of Wales’ by Thea Holme]

Picture: Claremont House, ca. 1860 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Claremont.JPG